27 7 / 2014

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

(via feathersflight)

27 7 / 2014

jon-snow:

god bless sdcc

(via evilfeministfromspace)

27 7 / 2014

27 7 / 2014

"In 1979, when the minimum wage was $2.90, a hard-working student with a minimum-wage job could earn enough in one day (8.44 hours) to pay for one academic credit hour. If a standard course load for one semester consisted of maybe 12 credit hours, the semester’s tuition could be covered by just over two weeks of full-time minimum wage work—or a month of part-time work. A summer spent scooping ice cream or flipping burgers could pay for an MSU education. The cost of an MSU credit hour has multiplied since 1979. So has the federal minimum wage. But today, it takes 60 hours of minimum-wage work to pay off a single credit hour, which was priced at $428.75 for the fall semester."

27 7 / 2014

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

(via officialjohnconstantine)

26 7 / 2014

sdzoo:

Give your kitty lots of kisses this Caturday.

(via chocolate-dandy)

26 7 / 2014

Government agents from A Vague Yet Menacing Agency were in the back, watching. (x)

(Source: natxromanoff, via bessibels)

26 7 / 2014

jitterbugjive:

dollygale:

brandx:

dorianthewellendowed:

jimmyfury:

zarabithia:

queerhawkeye:

beanarie:

Yeeeees? And?

I’m taking this as a compliment to Elementary.

LOL.
Not Featuring A Dude Who Makes Rape Jokes is `100% a compliment.

Not mayo on white bread.


#Not a show where women are punchlines?#Not a show where women are reduced to sexy plot devices or bitches?#Not a show with only 1 poc regular cast member despite the series taking place in one of the most culturally diverse cities#in the english speaking world?#OH NO#OH GOSH HOW TERRIBLE.


Not a show helmed by a dude so racist he regurgitates Yellow Peril conspiracy theories circa 1898.
Not a show that reduces WOC to antagonistic shrews/wilting lotus flowers but rather casts a WOC in the lead to totally pwn a white British supervillain that tries to reduce her to a ‘mascot’
Not a show that constantly queerbaits its viewers and mocks them for daring to interpret the characters as anything other than cishet men.

a show featuring 100% canon trans and gay characters that handles them like real human beings a show that turns misogynistic tropes on their heads a show that calls its white male protagonists out on his shita show with an adaptation of sherlock who praises women a show with flawless writing that showcases how women actually actdo i really need to go on

A show that doesn’t spoon feed you mysteries with super special effects
A show where Watson and Sherlock are friends on equal levels rather than making Watson the underdog
A show that understands the audience is just as important as the characters and allows them the chance to connect and deduce on their own
A show that shows Sherlock as a man completely capable of having a heart, but having too much pride to show it
A show with strong character development that stays consistent
God forbid

jitterbugjive:

dollygale:

brandx:

dorianthewellendowed:

jimmyfury:

zarabithia:

queerhawkeye:

beanarie:

Yeeeees? And?

I’m taking this as a compliment to Elementary.

LOL.

Not Featuring A Dude Who Makes Rape Jokes is `100% a compliment.

Not mayo on white bread.

Not a show helmed by a dude so racist he regurgitates Yellow Peril conspiracy theories circa 1898.

Not a show that reduces WOC to antagonistic shrews/wilting lotus flowers but rather casts a WOC in the lead to totally pwn a white British supervillain that tries to reduce her to a ‘mascot’

Not a show that constantly queerbaits its viewers and mocks them for daring to interpret the characters as anything other than cishet men.

a show featuring 100% canon trans and gay characters that handles them like real human beings
a show that turns misogynistic tropes on their heads
a show that calls its white male protagonists out on his shit
a show with an adaptation of sherlock who praises women
a show with flawless writing that showcases how women actually act
do i really need to go on

A show that doesn’t spoon feed you mysteries with super special effects

A show where Watson and Sherlock are friends on equal levels rather than making Watson the underdog

A show that understands the audience is just as important as the characters and allows them the chance to connect and deduce on their own

A show that shows Sherlock as a man completely capable of having a heart, but having too much pride to show it

A show with strong character development that stays consistent

God forbid

(Source: winston5mith, via chocolate-dandy)

26 7 / 2014

karadin:

Marvel Heroes with Fans (add more if you find em)

(via chocolate-dandy)

26 7 / 2014